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Membership details: •£20 per year - renewable at end of July* •Non-members £3.50 first 3 meetings then annual membership subscription due pro rata for remaining meetings. •Free to under 18s and full time students. Proof of status may be required. •Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.
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Next Meeting: Wednesday February 10 at 8:00pm on Zoom University of Hertfordshire Presents:
Our February meeting will be rather different from usual. Instead of a single guest speaker, we will have four! They all either study or work at the University of Hertfordshire on aspects of astronomy.

John Collins is a member of HAG and a mature student.

His topic is “The hard work - Processing thousands of automatically-taken images and encountering various snags and catches. The REM (Rapid-Eye Movement) automatic camera in La Silla Chile takes several hundred automatic photographs of the sky every day in 7 different filters viewing the same patch of sky. John will talk about the challenges of extracting useful data from the results with particular reference to stars close to the solar system, notably Proxima Centauri and Barnard's Star. This is John’s PhD project Dr Carolyn Devereaux is a lecturer in astrophysics at the University of Hertfordshire and her research is on dark matter, cosmology and galaxy evolution. Her subject is “What is dark matter? The evidence and search for dark matter” and will include interesting stories about the astronomers involved in the discovery of dark matter Her very recent book; “Cosmological Clues” goes into this in detail. Zhen Guo is doing post-doctorate research as part of the star formation group at the University, which is part of the world's largest infrared astronomy survey towards the galactic centre. Numerous variable young stars were discovered from this project, and are discussed in "Naughty newborns in infrared astronomy" Jo Ramasawmy is a PhD student. When astronomers began examining the universe in radio waves they made the huge discovery that they could learn about all kinds of physics by looking at light outside of the visible spectrum. "Invisible light - astronomy across the electromagnetic spectrum" Jo will talk about how we can use “invisible” light to investigate what's going on in distant galaxies, and how she is using different kinds of light, from radio waves to X-rays, to try to understand how supermassive black holes shape the galaxies they live in.
Guests welcome
Sun, Moon and Mars Richard Sheppard September - November 2020
Topic: University of Hertfordshire Presentations Time: Feb 10, 2021 19:30 London Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/91029281009?pwd=WTRZQmxCUmJnWE11U0taWTcwe HVKUT09 Meeting ID: 910 2928 1009 Passcode: 840423
Space Art We often promote astrophotography as a way of recording what we observe in the night sky but there are other ways. Have a look at these stunning drawings and paintings created by Martin Taylor
What's it all about?
Star-filled skies are one of the most magical sights our countryside has to offer. We want to reconnect people across the country with the wonder of a truly dark sky.
Our research shows that light pollution is leaving fewer stars than ever visible to the naked eye, and we need your help to track how light levels are changing.
⭐ Become a ‘citizen scientist’ and take part in our Star Count, a cosmic census to map light pollution. This year we'll be asking you to take part from home.
�� We’ll be asking you to choose a clear night between 6-14 February 2021 and look to the skies to see how many stars you can spot within Orion.
�� And don’t worry, we’ll give lots of guidance so you know where to look! It’s a great, easy piece of stargazing – no telescopes required – for kids and adults, and it can be done safely from your garden, balcony or even bedroom window.
Register your interest now to make sure you’re the first to hear more about Star Count 2021.
Next Meeting: Wednesday February 10 at 8:00pm on Zoom University of Hertfordshire Presents:
Our February meeting will be rather different from usual. Instead of a single guest speaker, we will have four! They all either study or work at the University of Hertfordshire on aspects of astronomy.

John Collins is a member of HAG and a mature student.

His topic is “The hard work - Processing thousands of automatically-taken images and encountering various snags and catches. The REM (Rapid-Eye Movement) automatic camera in La Silla Chile takes several hundred automatic photographs of the sky every day in 7 different filters viewing the same patch of sky. John will talk about the challenges of extracting useful data from the results with particular reference to stars close to the solar system, notably Proxima Centauri and Barnard's Star. This is John’s PhD project Dr Carolyn Devereaux is a lecturer in astrophysics at the University of Hertfordshire and her research is on dark matter, cosmology and galaxy evolution. Her subject is “What is dark matter? The evidence and search for dark matter” and will include interesting stories about the astronomers involved in the discovery of dark matter Her very recent book; “Cosmological Clues” goes into this in detail. Zhen Guo is doing post-doctorate research as part of the star formation group at the University, which is part of the world's largest infrared astronomy survey towards the galactic centre. Numerous variable young stars were discovered from this project, and are discussed in "Naughty newborns in infrared astronomy" Jo Ramasawmy is a PhD student. When astronomers began examining the universe in radio waves they made the huge discovery that they could learn about all kinds of physics by looking at light outside of the visible spectrum. "Invisible light - astronomy across the electromagnetic spectrum" Jo will talk about how we can use “invisible” light to investigate what's going on in distant galaxies, and how she is using different kinds of light, from radio waves to X-rays, to try to understand how supermassive black holes shape the galaxies they live in.
Topic: University of Hertfordshire Presentations Time: Feb 10, 2021 19:30 London Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/91029281009?pwd=WTRZQmxCUmJnWE1 1U0taWTcweHVKUT09 Meeting ID: 910 2928 1009 Passcode: 840423
2020 Hertford Astronomy Group
Hertford  Astronomy Group

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