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Next Meeting: Wednesday February 9th at 8:00pm on Zoom From Here to the Edge of the Observable Universe Robin Catchpole
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Membership details: •£10 per year - renewable at end of July* •Non-members £2.00 first 3 meetings then annual membership subscription due pro rata for remaining meetings. •Free to under 18s and full time students. Proof of status may be required. •Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.
You are invited to a Zoom meeting. When: Feb 9, 2022 19:30 for 20:00 London Register in advance for this meeting: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEscu6qrzwpHdaALZIqdY9BCwvlesxIguXH After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
Here's our current programme for the upcoming year - all subject to confirmation and change due to the current medical climate. Wed, Sep 8, 2021 Roger O’Brien Interstellar Communications Wed, Oct 13, 2021 Russell Parry The Appley Bridge Meteorite (Oct 13, 2014) Wed, Nov 10, 2021 Matt Bothwell The Invisible Universe Wed, Dec 8, 2021 Charles Barclay Henrietta Leavitt and the new Universe Wed, Jan 12, 2022 John Davies Missions to Near Earth Asteroids Wed, Feb 9, 2022 Robin Catchpole From Here to the Edge of the Observable Universe Wed, Mar 9, 2022 Katy Clough Solutions to Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity Wed, Apr 13, 2022 Jerry Stone Apollo 16 - 50th Anniversary Wed, May 11, 2022 Mike Dworetski William Herschel - The Bicentennial Wed, May 18, 2022 AGM Wed, Jun 8, 2022 TBC Taking Astronomy to the Public
This is a time in the history of astronomy when we can tell the story of the evolution of the universe from the moment when it was a fraction of a second old until the present day. A time of discovery within our solar system, of exoplanets and of the evolution of galaxies. However it is also a time when we have come to realise that we do not know what the majority of the universe is made of, or the nature of the force that is driving its accelerated expansion. In this talk I aim to give an overview of current understanding. Dr Robin M Catchpole Currently works at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University. Retired as Senior Astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich in September 2003. Joined the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) in 1962. After obtaining a BSc at University College London, he was posted to the Royal Observatory at the Cape of Good Hope, S Africa (now the South African Astronomical Observatory) and spent the next 24 years, working first in Pretoria, at the Radcliffe Observatory and then in Cape Town. Obtained his doctorate at the University of Cape Town. In 1991 he returned to the RGO in Cambridge, until it closed in 1998, when he moved to Greenwich as Senior Astronomer. Has authored and co-authored over 120 research papers and articles. Research interests include, the composition of stars, exploding stars, the structure of our Galaxy and galaxies with black holes at their centres. Has given over 1000 popular lectures and 420 radio and TV interviews.
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Next Meeting: Wednesday February 9th at 8:00pm on Zoom From Here to the Edge of the Observable Universe Robin Catchpole
You are invited to a Zoom meeting. When: Feb 9, 2022 19:30 for 20:00 London Register in advance for this meeting: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEscu6qrzwpHdaALZIqdY9B CwvlesxIguXH After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
This is a time in the history of astronomy when we can tell the story of the evolution of the universe from the moment when it was a fraction of a second old until the present day. A time of discovery within our solar system, of exoplanets and of the evolution of galaxies. However it is also a time when we have come to realise that we do not know what the majority of the universe is made of, or the nature of the force that is driving its accelerated expansion. In this talk I aim to give an overview of current understanding. Dr Robin M Catchpole Currently works at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University. Retired as Senior Astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich in September 2003. Joined the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) in 1962. After obtaining a BSc at University College London, he was posted to the Royal Observatory at the Cape of Good Hope, S Africa (now the South African Astronomical Observatory) and spent the next 24 years, working first in Pretoria, at the Radcliffe Observatory and then in Cape Town. Obtained his doctorate at the University of Cape Town. In 1991 he returned to the RGO in Cambridge, until it closed in 1998, when he moved to Greenwich as Senior Astronomer. Has authored and co-authored over 120 research papers and articles. Research interests include, the composition of stars, exploding stars, the structure of our Galaxy and galaxies with black holes at their centres. Has given over 1000 popular lectures and 420 radio and TV interviews.
2021 Hertford Astronomy Group
Hertford  Astronomy Group